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Physics

Heat Exchanges

For the study of heat exchange to be performed more accurately, it is performed within a device called calorimeter, which consists of a closed container unable to exchange heat with the environment and its interior. Within a calorimeter, the placed bodies exchange heat until they reach thermal equilibrium.
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Chemistry

Curiosities (page 2)

How to make water not freeze? How do scientists handle radioactive materials? Acid in the muscles? Moisture of air Compresses and heat of dissolution Blood - a buffer in our body Why should not man drink distilled water? What does TNT mean? Alchemy How does sand become glass?
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Chemistry

Aldehydes

Aldehyde is any organic compound that has the functional group - CHO - attached to the carbon chain. Here are some examples of aldehydes: Utility The best known aldehyde is metanal. It is also called formic aldehyde or formaldehyde. It is a colorless gas with a very strong and irritating smell.
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Chemistry

Enthalpy (continued)

It is the enthalpy of a neutralization reaction (between an acid and a base forming salt and water). The reaction is exothermic. It is the variation of enthalpy verified in the neutralization of 1mol H + of acid by 1mol OH- of the base, being all substances in total or infinite dilution, at 25 ° C and 1atm. Examples: It is the variation of enthalpy involved in dissolving 1mol of a given substance in an amount of water sufficient for the obtained solution to be diluted.
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Chemistry

Ether

ÉTer is any organic compound where the carbon chain presents - O - between two carbons. Oxygen must be linked directly to two organic radicals (alkyl or aryl). The generic formula of ether is R - O - R, where R is the radical and O is the oxygen. Here are some examples: Utility The most well-known ether is ordinary ether, or ethoxyethane or diethyl ether.
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Chemistry

Colloids - Tips

- Systems where one or more components have particles with average dimensions less than 1000 nanometers (1 nanometer = 1nm = 10-9m). - Most colloids look cloudy or opaque. - Scattered is the least present substance. - Dismiss
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